Holiday Trash and Recycling

Holiday Greetings to all our Residents. Trash and recycle trucks will run on Monday, December 26, 2022 as normal. The same will happen the following week the day after New Year’s, Monday January 2, 2023. Best Trash encourages everyone to have their items out by 7 a.m.

By |2022-12-22T14:55:05-06:00December 22nd, 2022|Archive|

Stage 1 Drought Contingency Plan

The City of Houston and the North Harris County Regional Water Authority ‘NHCRWA’ have both implemented Stage 1 of their respective Drought Contingency Plans. As a participant of the NHCRWA, Cypress Hill MUD 1 is implementing Stage 1 of our Drought Contingency Plan immediately.

  • Check for and repair all leaks, dripping faucets, and running toilets.
  • Utilize water conservation measures such as displacement bags, low-flow shower heads and leak detection tablets. Additional water conservation tips can be found at https://wateru.nhcrwa.com and www.irrygator.com;
  • Limit irrigation to no more than two days per week, between 7:00 p.m. and 5:00 a.m. following the schedules below:
    • Sundays and Thursdays for single family residential participants with even-numbered street addresses.
    • Saturdays and Wednesdays for single family residential participants with odd-numbered street addresses.
    • Tuesdays and Fridays for all other participants.
    • No watering on Mondays.

These conditions are voluntary

By |2022-11-29T16:19:40-06:00June 23rd, 2022|Archive|

Hurricane Preparedness 2022

Be ready for hurricane season. Today you can determine your personal hurricane risk, find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone, and review/update insurance policies. You can also make a list of items to replenish hurricane emergency supplies and start thinking about how you will prepare your home for the coming hurricane season. If you live in hurricane-prone areas, you are encouraged to complete these simple preparations before hurricane season begins on June 1.


Find out today what types of wind and water hazards could happen where you live, and then start preparing how to handle them. Hurricanes are not just a coastal problem. impacts from wind and water can be felt hundreds of miles inland, and significant impacts can occur regardless of the storm’s strength. Know if you live in an area prone to flooding and if you’re safe to remain in your home.


Find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone. You may also need to leave if you live in a flood prone area or in a mobile home outside a hurricane evacuation zone. Now is the time to begin planning where you would go and how you would get there.

You do not need to travel hundreds of miles. Your destination could be a friend or relative who lives in a well built home outside flood prone areas. Remember, your safest place may be to remain home. Be sure to account for your pets in your plan.

As hurricane season approaches, listen to local officials on questions related to how you may need to adjust any evacuation plans based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.


Whether you’re evacuating or sheltering-in-place, you’re going to need supplies not just to get through the storm but for the potentially lengthy and unpleasant aftermath. Have enough non-perishable food, water and medicine to last each person in your family a minimum of 3 days (store a longer than 3-day supply of water, if possible). Electricity and water could be out for at least that long. You’ll need extra cash, a battery-powered radio and flashlights. You may need a portable crank or solar-powered USB charger for your cell phones.

If you need to go to a public shelter, follow health guidelines from your local officials and the CDC.


Call your insurance company or agent and ask for an insurance check-up to make sure you have enough insurance to repair or even replace your home and/or belongings. Remember, home and renters insurance doesn’t cover flooding, so you’ll need a separate policy for it.

Flood insurance is available through your company, agent, or the National Flood Insurance Program at floodsmart.gov. Act now, as flood insurance requires a 30-day waiting period.


Whether you’re evacuating, or planning to ride out the storm in your home, make sure it is in good repair and up to local hurricane building code specifications to withstand wind impacts. Many retrofits are not as costly or time consuming as you may think.

Have the proper plywood, steel or aluminum panels to board up the windows and doors. Remember, the garage door is the most vulnerable part of the home, so it must be able to withstand the winds.

If you’re a renter, work with your landlord now to prepare your home for a storm.


Many people rely on their neighbors before and after a disaster, and there are many ways you can help them. Learn about all the different actions you and your neighbors can take to prepare and recover from the hazards associated with hurricanes.

Start the conversation now with these Neighbor Helping Neighbor strategies but remember you may need to adjust your preparedness plans based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.


The time to prepare for a hurricane is before the season begins, when you have the time and are not under pressure. If you wait until a hurricane is on your doorstep, the odds are that you will be under duress and will make the wrong decisions.

Take the time now to write down your hurricane plan. Know who issues evacuation orders for your area, determine locations on where you will ride out the storm, and start to get your supplies now. Being prepared before a hurricane threatens makes you resilient to the hurricane impacts of wind and water. It will mean the difference between being a hurricane victim or a hurricane survivor.

By |2022-11-30T17:18:14-06:00May 11th, 2022|Archive|

Leaks Can Run- But They Cannot Hide

Drip, Drip, Drip…Let’s Talk Leaks!

Guess what! National Fix A Leak Week is March 14-20th and we want to be sure you have the best resources to keep you informed of the little problems caused by water leaks. Awareness of what to look for and knowledge of how to fix any leak issues can go a long way in prevention and saving money. Leaks can run, but they can’t hide!



Did you know that simple faucet leaks amount to approximately 1 trillion gallons of water wasted each year? That’s huge! And so easily preventable! Not to mention, leaks are costly. Taking time each year to perform a preventative check, can help keep your check book in order.
When you are on the hunt for possible leaks, it is important to start with the data… Begin with your water bill, check your meter, and test your toilets. These will give you some clue as to the prevalence of a water leak in your home.

The EPA recommends the following checklist for tracking down a leak! Here are some of the best-known hiding places to start. Keep your ears open!
  • Bathroom
    • Toilets
    • Faucets
    • Showerheads
    • Under the sink
    • Don’t forget the tub!
  • Laundry Room
    • Check all of your hook-ups!
    • Look for pooling in the washer itself (it could indicate a source leak)
  • Kitchen
    • Check all appliances, such as the dishwasher and fridge. Many times, there are leaks behind them.
  • Basement and Garage
    • Sinks
    • Exposed pipes
    • Water Heaters
  • Outside
    • Spigots
    • Irrigation controls and sprinkler heads

Well, that all depends on your plumbing skills. Whether you choose to call in a professional or venture down the DIY path, below are a few steps everyone should take… just in case.

  1. Turn off the water line to the leaking location.
  2. Identify the primary source of the leak.
  3. Document any and all damage (date, time, photos, description, etc.).
  4. If necessary, call your insurance company.
  5. Call in the professionals or DIY to fix any damage caused by the leak.
  6. Look for any secondary impacts caused by the leak, such as mold or mildew.

It’s important that everyone learn the ins and outs of their plumbing system to avoid costly repairs or surprise damages. Not only does it help protect your home and family, but you also help reduce any wasteful impacts to our water sources.
Enjoy Fix a Leak Week! Best of luck to all you DIY’ers!

Article Sources

Detect and Chase Down Leaks With Watersense
EPA- Fix a Leak Week
Home is Being Destroyed- Act Now.
How To Find Water Leaks In Your Home’s Plumbing
Dangers and Causes of Hidden Water Leaks in the House

Want to Learn More?

EPA- At Home Activity
Home Water Works
YouTube ~ Just search “Plumbing”
WaterSense- Fix a Leak Week

Other Resources

wikiHow- Find a Water Leak in Your House
Fancy Pants Homes- Common Household Water Leaks to Watch Out For/
Water Use It Wisely- Fix a Leak Week/
White House Utility District- Fix a Leak Week/

For Kids

EPA- Student Fact Sheet
EPA- Leak Detective

By |2022-04-01T22:12:02-05:00March 1st, 2022|Archive|

MUD Tax Payment Options

For the MUD Tax, there are a few payment options.

ASW does accept payments via the post with either personal check, cashier’s check, and money order. A homeowner may also visit us at one of our offices, as we accept cash payments onsite as well.

For electronic payments, homeowners can visit our website www.aswtax.com or call 888-477-0870 to make payments with a credit card or electronic check. Please keep in mind that these payments are accepted through a third-party, therefore there is a 2.99% fee.

One option is also for an electronic payment via bill payment through a homeowner’s personal bank. He/She would have to contact or setup through bank’s website directly and set up Cypress Hill MUD as a payee. Once setup, the bank may send the payment(s) on the homeowner’s behalf.

By |2022-04-09T09:17:38-05:00February 9th, 2022|Archive|

Trash Service Update 2/15/2021

Due to the safety of employees, residents and closure of landfills, Best Trash has made the decision to suspend services for Monday, 2/15/2021 and Tuesday, 2/16/2021. We are hopeful to be able to resume normal service on Wednesday, 2/17/2021. Please share this information with others in your neighborhood. For additional trash updates check back here or visit Best Trash online at www.best-trash.com

By |2021-02-19T22:00:28-06:00February 15th, 2021|Archive|

Freeze Watch

Cypress Hill MUD 1 residents, it is time to prepare for colder temperatures! There is a Freeze Watch in effect for Sunday night through Tuesday morning, February 14th – February 16, 2021. Temperatures are expected to drop to freezing levels overnight.

How can District residents prepare? Practice the “Four P’s” as the cold fronts set in:

People:

  • Dress in warm clothing, wear coats and gloves when outdoors.
  • Protect children and the elderly. Never leave them in a cold place or vehicle.
  • Temperatures are predicted to be in the teens Monday night and Tuesday morning.

Pets:

  • Bring your pets indoors.
  • Provide a warm, safe place for them to eat and sleep.

Pipes:

  • Prevent frozen pipes and damage to your home by opening the cabinets under the kitchen and bathroom sinks to allow warm air to circulate and warm the pipes.
  • Insulate outdoor faucets and exposed pipes and be sure to disconnect and drain hoses from outdoor spigots.

Plants:

  • Protect plants from freezing by covering them with plant-cover fabric, or a light blanket with plastic sheeting on top of it.
  • Hydrate plants early so they can absorb and stay healthy through the cold.

Additionally, there are a few vehicle-safety tips to observe during winter weather:

  • Keep your gas tank full.
  • Have tire pressure checked.
  • Have a phone charger, first aid kit, blankets, and jumper cables in your car.
  • Check local road conditions at www.houstontranstar.org. State highway information available at www.drivetexas.org.

Lastly, Fire Departments have provided some safety tips surrounding space heaters and other supplemental heating sources during the colder days:

  • Never leave a space heater unattended or a child unattended with a space heater.
  • Keep all combustible materials (including yourself!) at least three (3) feet away from the heater.
  • Never overload outlets or breakers.
  • Do not use extension cords for the heater.
  • Always turn it off if leaving the room and/or going to sleep.
By |2021-03-06T12:53:04-06:00February 11th, 2021|Archive|

No Boil Water Notice

Cypress Hill Municipal Utility District residents may have learned that there was a main line break that is affecting the City of Houston. A boil water notice has been suggested for residents of the City of Houston only.

This news post is to let Cypress Hill MUD residents know this suggested boil water notice and main line break will not affect the District. The District does not receive any service or water from the City of Houston, and the system is working as designed and without issue.

Again, the District will not be affected in any way by the situation in the City of Houston.

By |2021-03-06T12:53:36-06:00February 28th, 2020|Archive|
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